Yo Teach…! Or how to avoid teaching like Jason

Closing the Teach For America Blogging Gap

Betting markets are very effective at predicting outcomes because they force all involved to consume the vast amounts of often conflicting and nuanced information and make a simple decision: buy or sell. This, done thousands of times by thousands of people, send a strong and surprisingly accurate signal. With all the talk, all the nuance,…

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If anyone were to ask me to list the five current thinkers in education I admire most, find the most interesting, or whose books I would most like to be stuck with on a desert island, I would certainly have Rick Hess in one of my top three slots. Hess is a philosophically conservative thinker–he…

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Jul 26 2013

(late) introductions

When I first started this blog, I mainly used it as a pressure valve. I taught every day and rarely had time for much else, but I needed the outlet in case I read something on this website or in the news that would get me so worked up that I wouldn’t be able to…

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There’s been a lot of talk about teacher education the past couple of years. In fact, everyone knows that the state of teacher education is in crisis. Of course, the definitions of these crises are antithetical depending on who you ask. More frustratingly, they are both reasonable. My goal in this post is to outline…

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I have recently made the decision to become a member of audible, entitling me to two free audiobooks a month. The benefit of this lovely service is I get to consume way more educational nonfiction without having to take time from teaching/lesson planning/gym. The drawback is that unlike with fiction, I love having books on…

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I’ve been trying for a while now to draw out my thoughts on education reform in a relatively clear way. However, when I think about any subject, I like to think not just in terms of how things are, but rather how they are changing. So, what follows is a hypothesis (or really a series…

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In the fall, I will begin a doctoral program in educational policy. I’m hoping to spend the next few months clarifying my thoughts on schools and education reform, and I think the best way to do that is to read a diverse and influential series of articles and books that challenge and expand my assumptions…

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In response to the ever-vexing Joel Klein, a couple Atlantic authors released a solid critique of the new “teacher bar exam” movement. No doubt, teaching has definitely solidified for me the idea that “standard resume characteristics — level of education, certifications or licenses, and experience beyond the first few years of teaching — have essentially…

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At a recent TFA professional Saturday, someone mentioned that they don’t like the term Achievement gap, using instead the term achievement deficit. I’ve never really thought of what’s implied by the term achievement gap, but hearing him say achievement deficit sparked a few thoughts, tied mainly to my understanding of our economic deficits. Deficits come…

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I have a lot of mixed feelings about debates surrounding educational reform. On the one hand, I believe that Sweden–where educational achievement has plummeted since it implemented a universal and even egalitarian voucher system in the early 1990s–is the evidence all critics of school choice should point to that even in the best circumstances, school choice will…

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Pontifications of the Unplaced

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